Share your raw fleece sources?

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on Apr 27, 2011 2:18 PM

Hi I am new to this forum.. I raise alpacas and have lots of fleece for sale. Check out my website www.atozalpacas.com  and on facebook www.facebook.com/atozalpacas 

A to Z Alpacas 
Alberta Canada
Leslie Unruh
atozalpacas@gmail.com  

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jennyct13 wrote
on Jun 4, 2011 6:24 AM

I hope that no one minds a little shameless self-promotion, but I have an Etsy shop where I sell clean, hand dyed fleece and locks- most specifically Targhee and Wensleydale. I also like to mix it up a bit with other types- Finnsheep, Cormo, Romney, Mohair, Alpaca, assorted cross-breeds, and various silk preparations. I also sell carded batts, and handspun art yarn and traditional yarn. I process, dye, spin and felt all of the fibers that I sell, and I'm happy to offer advice, suggestions, and help with any or all of them.

I love custom orders, and list new items nearly every weekday. Jenny Fields Fiber

 

 

Fiber art for beautiful geniuses.

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nismo591 wrote
on Jun 24, 2011 6:51 PM

We own a small alpaca farm in oberlin ohio with 22 Huacayas who all have either royal baby or baby fiber. We recently had them sheared and have high quality blankets and seconds for sale. If intersted please email me at vklangston@gmail.com and i can send pics of each and prices. very reasonable pricing!

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tielserrath wrote
on Jun 29, 2011 3:20 AM

*waves*

Hi Jenny! Satisfied customer here!

*waves again*

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vanalpaca wrote
on Nov 19, 2011 11:14 AM

I am sorry, I have that ostresized herd of alpacas, both suri and huacayas and I have a variety of colors and fleeces available, prime blankets and for a quarter of the cost per pound, neck, flank, and shoulder fiber as well. I would like the folks that have listed their sheep here to send me their price lists and sheep types for my resource page or to link to my page on facebook, imaginary alpaca ranch. I belong to the black swamp spinning guild and live in northwest ohio and know many spinning friends and we like to dabble in different fleece/fibers as well. I also love to blend my alpaca with other types of wool to give it a bit more variety in the spun yarns. With 30 fleeces available annually, it is a lot to work with and I feel really guilty buying other fibers to spin, but oh, well, when you are addicted to fiber like we are.........and DYE and FELT that fireman of yours a BIG RED FIRETRUCK for Christmas this year......Cheers all. you can email me at vanalpaca@hotmail.com and I'm looking for less VM in the fleeces as I will probably send it out to be put into rovings at a mini mill in Indiana that does a good job. After all, shearing happens once or twice a year, right??

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Siouxsan wrote
on May 5, 2012 3:43 PM

So glad you posted here - after a 10 year hiatus from Spinning, I am back at it - just got a wheel and was looking for cool fiber - I love your colors, so be looking for an order soon.

Sioux

 

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Posts 4
Kelly Bell wrote
on Jan 3, 2013 12:45 AM

Oh, I'm so jealous!! I've been looking everywhere for some FinnSheep fleeces. Do you still have any available at your farm? If you have Dorset Down also, I'm definitely interested!

Thanks!

Kelly (kelly AT gothamcityfiberarts DOT com)

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Kelly Bell wrote
on Jan 3, 2013 12:48 AM

Mary Tucker, I was trying to reply to your post specifically - do you have any Finn fleeces left? Or Dorset Down? I'm very interested, and I live in NYC, if so. I'm fervently hoping to have my own spinning flock sometime in the next 5 years!

Thanks,

Kelly AT gothamcityfiberarts DOT com

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on Oct 19, 2014 2:20 PM

I raise Navajo Churros and Babydoll Southdowns. The NC wool is great for boot socks and braided rugs.(I've used an Embellish I cord knitter and made a few fabulous rugs.See my projects on Ravelry under maguiles.) The babydoll is very soft and surprisingly does not felt at all..I've tried to make a felted sample to see if I could make slippers and no go....

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Kelly Bell wrote
on Oct 19, 2014 4:52 PM
All the Down breeds share this quality (not felting) - "Nature's own superwash", is how I brand it in my yarn lines, and they all make FABULOUS sock yarn. Suffolk is one of my faves, as well as Blue Texel (sadly, the latter is unavailable in the US - only the UK has them). However, regular white Texel is just as excellent, especially if you buy from a shepherd that cares about wool too, not just meat. It's VERY hard to find Suffolk fleeces that are in decent/spinnable shape, for the same reason. 
I am really happy to see a sourcing list coming together here for raw fleece in the US. This is desperately needed, IMHO. But it needs to be done without a profit motivation. 
I've started a nonprofit for fiber artists in the Pacific Northwest, called Cascadia Fibershed. Right now there is just a Facebook group (and it's an open group so if you're interested please join). Even if you're not in Cascadia, you might be interested in what we're talking about. There are tons of details there, but I most highly recommend downloading our brochure PDF, which explains everything. 
You might especially be interested in the Marketplace web site that we are building, as well. Look for the post with Marketplace in the title. 
I bring this up because it's my hope that new Fibersheds will start springing up all over the country, doing exactly what we are doing. 
If I may ask, do you belong to your local Grange? 
I'm a shepherd too - Shetlands, which do very well here because of their hardiness and resistance to foot rot (temperate rain forest!). 

Kelly Bell
Cascadia Fibershed
YARNSPOTTING
kelly AT yarnspotting  DOT com
(Ravelry, Twitter, Etsy, Instagram: @yarnspotting)
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Posts 4
Kelly Bell wrote
on Oct 19, 2014 4:58 PM

Note: the Cascadia Fibershed Marketplace will be FREE to all members to join, advertise and sell. Free everything. The only requirement is that they live/work in the Cascadia bioregion. It's purpose is to strengthen regional trade and boost regional self-reliance and sustainability for shepherds, artists and the fiber community. 

-Kelly

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