Dyeing Yarn

When crushed, these iridescent, dried bugs yield a deep red dye. Photo: Kate Larson.

Exhibit: The Red That Colored the World at the Bowers Museum

  Cochineal bugs yield a marvelous red dye that has been a favorite among spinners, weavers, and embroiderers for many generations. Today, cochineal is used by both traditional and modern fiber artists across the globe, and it is often included in guild dye-day events.   The fiber world has been buzzing this year about a…

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Handspun for Tapestry Weaving?

  Rebecca spun a singles yarn to create a color gradation for tapestry weaving. Photo: Rebecca Mezoff. Hokett loom in action. Photo: Rebecca Mezoff.   Rebecca Mezoff might be based in Fort Collins, Colorado, but she is sharing her passion for tapestry weaving all over the world. Coming from a family of weavers and later…

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A Q&A with Fiber Prep Instructor Courtney Mussatt

    Courtney Mussatt If you visit every local fiber festival and exclaim over a sheep’s crimp, or look at bags of raw fleece in frustration, or vow “Never again!” after a fiber prep experience gone wrong, we’ve got the perfect webinar for you. Join us on August 24 for the live version, or download…

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How to Dye Yarn Naturally

    Click here to download your free eBook! For some of us, the pleasure of using natural dyes is the connection it gives us with the earth, using plants and fungi and minerals from the environment in our handmade projects. Others enjoy the challenge of finding, working with, and sometimes even growing unpredictable materials,…

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Natural DyesColor Like No Other

  Betty Barry's ombré yarns in stunning naturally-dyed colors. Photos courtesy of Betty Barry. Ombré at work! Shawl knitted with Betty's hand-dyed yarns. Dye Day sponsored by Fort Wayne Parks and Recreation. Betty shown center front.   The fiber scene, like any thriving community, is ever-evolving. Tools, techniques, and fibers come in and out of popularity.…

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The Magic of Indigo

    Photo by Diane Palme. We asked textile artist Diane Palme about her affinity for indigo and the dyeing process. Read on to learn about her best practices for creating beautiful blue hues, then check out her blog. –Gina   From blue jeans to kimono, tagelmusts to tattoos, for centuries indigo has been used…

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How Much Sheep Excitement Can I Handle?

    Okay, maybe I can't draw a sheep. At least not with a mouse. Deborah Gerish Group Content Manager spinningdaily.com People tell me I’m obsessed with sheep. Maybe it’s because they’re the only animal I can draw: make a cloud and add some legs. Maybe it’s their undeniable cuteness–my old studio was decorated with…

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Local Color

Many years ago, when I was just entering the world of spinning and dyeing, I hosted a dye workshop for my local guild. We set up Coleman stoves all over our rural backyard and cooked up everything from indigo to cochineal to rabbit brush to elderberries (not light fast!). There was so much joy in…

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Travel and textilesthe stuff of life.

Ercil Howard-Wroth snapped this perfect cover photo while on a textile tour in Peru. Read about her adventure on pg. 52. The search for new horizons, new traditions, and really, new parts of ourselves, can be absolutely intoxicating. For me, travel has always been a search for the daily life of a place and people.…

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Indigo, an elusive dye that never ceases to amaze

Deepen Your Understanding of Indigo Dagmar Klos is a master dyer, fiber artist, and teacher. From 1995–2006, she served as copublisher and coeditor of the Turkey Red Journal, a newsletter dedicated to natural dyes. Recently she has released two workshop videos through Interweave, Natural Dyeing and Overdyeing with Natural Dyes. We asked her here today to share a valuable lesson she learned…